BLACKBERRIES   

The blackberry is actually an ancient fruit, prescribed by the Ancient Greeks for gout, the Native Americans for stomach ailments, mentioned in the Bible, and commonly written about in British folklore.

 

OUR BLACKBERRY OPERATION

BLACKBERRY HEALTH FACTS

BLACKBERRY LINKS

Click Here to try our new Blackberry Juice! It is 100% juice, sweetened with muscadine juice.

 

OUR BLACKBERRY OPERATION

Our blackberry season lasts from end of May to July (depending on the weather!  We have a U-pick field open to the public, and we always have already picked blackberries on hand during the harvest season!  We are the 2nd largest blackberry growers East of the Mississippi River.  Our farm is in Enigma, GA (South Georgia).  In addition to the U-pick field, we sell our berries commercially through SunnyRidge Berry Center.  Look for the Sunnyridge label in your grocery store--those might be our berries!  We currently grow 4 different varieties: Apache, Arapaho, Chickasaw, and Navajo.  Yes, those are Indian names!  They were named this way b/c blackberries are native to this land, they were here with the Native Americans.  We have varieties with and without thorns, and some get very large, as pictured above.  Our rows are staked up, and kept very clean, with the vines tied back for easy access!

PICKING:

We usually pick everyday during peak season, weather permitting.  The blackberries are hand-picked, straight into the container that you will buy.  After being picked, they are brought to our packing shed where we grade them.  After grading, the berries are moved into the 1st cooling room and put on a forced air fan which essentially sucks all of the heat from the container and the berries.  After each pallet has been on the fan for the appropriate amount of time (or temperature of berries is appropriate), they are moved into a slightly colder room to await shipment. We ship our berries everyday to ensure freshness.  They are shipped to Sunnyridge Berry Center in Homerville, GA.

 

 

BLACKBERRY HEALTH FACTS

  • Blackberries have recently been pinpointed as a leading source of compounds thought to produce health benefits for women, due to their high concentrations of phytoestrogens.  Phytoestrogens, literally "plant estrogens", have been of interest to the scientific community b/c of their possible roll in prevention of both breast and cervical cancer. Studies now indicate that blackberries may contain some of the highest levels of phytoestrogens.  These compounds act as a natural form of estrogen.  During studies at the Univeristy of Helsinki in Finland, scientists measured eight different berries for their phytoestrogen level, and concluded that blackberries had the highest level of phytoestrogens followed by strawberries.  (Northland Berry News Fall2001)
  • Blackberries are considered to be an astringent because of their high tannin content. Studies show that tannins tighten tissue, lesson minor bleeding, and may help to alleviate diarrhea and intestinal inflammation. German health authorities recommend blackberries for mild infections including sore throats and mouth irritations. Traditionally, blackberries have been used to alleviate hemorrhoids because of their rich tannin content. Scientists have also reported anti-tumor properties associated with tannins found in some varieties of blackberries. Future research will explore the implications for treating human cancer. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Blackberries abound in antioxidants, such as anthocyanin pigments, responsible for the purplish-black color of blackberries and may impart health benefits because of their antioxidant properties. Additional antioxidants in blackberries are vitamins C and E, and ellagic acid; all may provide protection against cancer and chronic disease. Cooking does not seem to destroy ellagic acid, so even blackberry jams and desserts retain ellagic acid health benefits. Interestingly, blackberries are a natural source of salicylate, an active substance found in aspirin. Potential benefits have yet to be explored and some experts advise caution to particularly aspirin-sensitive individuals. Because of their many tiny seeds, blackberries are a source of soluble fiber, such as pectin. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Berries: source of lycopene and ellagic acid, phytochemicals that prevent the cell damage that may lead to cancer. Blackberries are one of the few fruits that contain heart-protective vitamin E. Berries also strengthen blood vessels, protecting eyesight and reducing heart disease risk. (IDG books, 1999)
  • Blackberries are high in fiber and vitamin C. They are effective in the treatment of watery diarrhea, weak stomachs, inflamed throat, and laryngitis, as well as when applied externally in the treatment of wounds. (vitabit.com)
  • Research is indicating that dark colored berries, such as blackberries are rich in phenolics such as anthocyanins and ellagic acid.  These are potent antioxidants. (Northland Berry News Summer2001)
  • We have all heard about the importance of antioxidants in forestalling the aging process.  Just as your metal saw left in the elements rusts due to oxidation, your body deteriorates due to the effects of oxidation.  Antioxidants fight the process of aging by fighting off the diseases associated with old age.  Antioxidants neutralize free radicals, which can damage DNA molecules and lead to cancer.  They also counteract environmental carcinogens, protect against cardiovascular diease, fight sun damage to skin and may thwart the effects of Alzheimer's and other age related disorders.  Blackberries are among the top ten foods containing the highest antioxidant levels.
  • Their flavor is one of the greatest reasons to eat blackberries. Beyond this rich flavor, blackberries, like all berries, are nutrition all-stars. A handful of these delicious berries provides a powerful team of nutrients including vitamin C, folate, potassium, manganese, and magnesium. To top it off, one cup or handful of blackberries supplies 8 grams of fiber, including cholesterol-lowering pectin. The fiber rich seeds contain high levels of ellagic acid, a potent antioxidant that battles cancer in many different ways. Blackberries with their high fiber content reduce the risk of developing diabetes and intestinal disease such as diverticulosis, as well as fight against obesity. The deep blue and purple colors of blackberries top the charts as the leading disease fighting pigment. Foods rich in this brilliant blue color, the anthocyannin pigment, quench more free radicals in the body than any other food, protecting against all disease. (saveonfoods.com)

Click Here to try our new Blackberry Juice! It is 100% juice, sweetened with muscadine juice.

 
 

BLACKBERRY INFO LINKS

www.wholehealthmd.com

www.health24.com

www.fight-cancers.com

www.truestarhealth.com

www.saveonfoods.com